Omelet with Leeks, Spring Herbs, and Goat Cheese

By <i>Eating Local:</i> Reprinted with permission of Andrews McMeel Publishing, recipes by Janet Fletcher, photography by Sara Remington
Images
Omelet with Leeks, Spring Herbs, and Goat Cheese
Serves
Makes 1 omelet
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup thinly sliced leeks, white and pale green parts only
  • Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 ounces fresh goat cheese, at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh chervil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh chives
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh Italian parsley, plus more for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon water


Procedure
As the former proprietor of a popular breakfast and lunch spot in California’s Napa Valley, Sally Gordon has made thousands of omelets. She has closed the restaurant, sadly, but fortunately she has not lost her omelet technique. Her secret is whisking the eggs furiously until they produce a frothy foam, a step that yields an especially light result.

Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in a small skillet over moderately low heat. Add the leeks, season with salt and pepper, and stir to coat with the butter. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the leeks are tender but not meltingly soft, about 10 minutes.

In a small bowl, mash the goat cheese with the chervil until blended.

Crack the eggs into a bowl and add the chives, parsley, and water. Beat vigorously with a whisk until the eggs are light and very foamy.

Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter in a 10-inch nonstick skillet over moderately high heat. When the butter begins to sizzle and foam, add the eggs and spread them in an even layer with a heatproof rubber spatula. Let the eggs set for a few seconds, then use the spatula to push the firmer cooked egg at the edges toward the center of the skillet so that the uncooked portion flows onto the bare pan bottom. With the spatula, gently pat the eggs into an even layer.

When the eggs have almost completely set but are still a little moist on the surface, dollop the goat cheese on one-half. Spoon the leeks over the goat cheese. Fold the other half of the omelet over the filling and slide the omelet onto a warm plate. Top with a little parsley and serve immediately.

Omelet with Leeks, Spring Herbs, and Goat Cheese

By <i>Eating Local:</i> Reprinted with permission of Andrews McMeel Publishing, recipes by Janet Fletcher, photography by Sara Remington
Serves
Makes 1 omelet
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup thinly sliced leeks, white and pale green parts only
  • Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 ounces fresh goat cheese, at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh chervil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh chives
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh Italian parsley, plus more for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon water


Procedure
As the former proprietor of a popular breakfast and lunch spot in California’s Napa Valley, Sally Gordon has made thousands of omelets. She has closed the restaurant, sadly, but fortunately she has not lost her omelet technique. Her secret is whisking the eggs furiously until they produce a frothy foam, a step that yields an especially light result.

Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in a small skillet over moderately low heat. Add the leeks, season with salt and pepper, and stir to coat with the butter. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the leeks are tender but not meltingly soft, about 10 minutes.

In a small bowl, mash the goat cheese with the chervil until blended.

Crack the eggs into a bowl and add the chives, parsley, and water. Beat vigorously with a whisk until the eggs are light and very foamy.

Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter in a 10-inch nonstick skillet over moderately high heat. When the butter begins to sizzle and foam, add the eggs and spread them in an even layer with a heatproof rubber spatula. Let the eggs set for a few seconds, then use the spatula to push the firmer cooked egg at the edges toward the center of the skillet so that the uncooked portion flows onto the bare pan bottom. With the spatula, gently pat the eggs into an even layer.

When the eggs have almost completely set but are still a little moist on the surface, dollop the goat cheese on one-half. Spoon the leeks over the goat cheese. Fold the other half of the omelet over the filling and slide the omelet onto a warm plate. Top with a little parsley and serve immediately.